Lomopedia: Yashica MG-1

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The Yashica MG-1 was a typical 35mm rangefinder camera from the 1970s, and among the last sturdy, full-sized cameras before the so-called Plastic Age. Find out more about this popular rangefinder beauty from Yashica in this installment of Lomopedia!

Released in 1975, the Yashica MG-1 is considered to be the last member of Yashica’s rangefinder camera line, and one of the “last samurais” before the so-called Plastic Age. It’s a fixed-lens 35mm rangefinder camera equipped with a Yashinon f/2.8 45mm lens and aperture-priority autoamtic exposure. The exposure system is run by a CdS meter (powered by one 5.6V mercury battery or equivalent) placed above the lens. The MG-1 has the same size and look as the Yashica Electro line of rangefinders, and also has two LEDs on top of its body which indicate slow speed and overexposure. It was available in either chrome or black body.

Photos via Wikipedia (Spanish) and 50mm on Blogspot

Technical Specifications:

  • Lens: Yashinon 45 mm f/2.8 lens composed of four elements in three groups.
  • Shutter: Electronic controlled leaf-type shutter providing continuously variable speeds from 1/500 sec. to 2 sec. approx.; built-in self-timer; direct X contact shoe (shutter speed automatically sets at 1/30 sec. when the Auto Lever is adjusted to ‘flash’)
  • Exposure Control: Fully automatic CdS ‘Top-Eye’ exposure control through preselection of exposure symbol (lens aperture); red and yellow exposure indicator arrows in the viewfinder and camera top; EV range from EV2 to 17 (at ASA 100); ASA range from 25 to 800.
  • Viewfinder: Coupled range/viewfinder with parallax correction marks; image magnification: 0.59X; red and yellow exposure indicator arrows visible through the viewfinder
  • Focusing: Focus secured by rotating the focusing ring and superimposing two images in the focusing spot at the center of the viewfinder field; distance scale from 1 meter (3.3 ft) to infinity.
  • Film Advance: One action film advance lever (180°) advances the exposed frame and charges the shutter multi-slot take-up spool for easy film loading; auto resetting exposure counter; rapid rewind crank-handle.
  • Power Source: 5.6V mercury battery (Eveready E164 Mallory PX32 or equivalent)
  • Size: 140.5 × 72 × 82 mm
Credits: moscaroline, coca, m_esn4 & manuel8121

All information for this article were sourced from Camerapedia, Yashica Guy, The Camera Site, Butkus.org, and Rangefinder-Cameras.com.

written by plasticpopsicle on 2014-02-10 in #reviews #lomopedia #35mm #yashica #yashica-mg-1 #mg-1 #lomography #rangefinder-camera

One Comment

  1. rbruce63
    rbruce63 ·

    The selection of pictures is outstanding! Of special note the mysterious redhead behind the gorgeous MG-1 and the dogs ready to catch the Vespa and mark her as their territory! Thanks for reminding us that these Yashicas are good machines for documenting our life's and recording beauty!

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