The Rubikon - A DIY Paper Pinhole Camera

2

Pinholes can pretty much be made from anything, from matchboxes, soda cans, to even turtles and armadillos. But you have to start somewhere simple first and here's a good place as any!

If you’re feeling a bit burnt out and down in the dumps, trying out pinhole photography can help! It is photography bare bones, no bells and whistles, and stripped down to the very essentials. You have the option of buying a pre-made pinhole, but you can also build one yourself! It’ll teach you heaps about how light works, exposure, and of course, patience.

Jaroslav Juřica designed a simple pinhole you can do yourself. All you’ll need is a printer and some sturdy paper – that’s it! Make sure to follow the instructions though! Good luck on making it and let us know how you do!

Here are the instructions and the document!

written by cruzron on 2013-08-21 in #gear #tipster #pinhole #paper #35mm #tipster #diy

2 Comments

  1. wmckin11
    wmckin11 ·

    Thanks so much for this! I remember seeing the document for this a long time ago, went and bought card for it then lost the link to the doc... Now I can finally print it out!

  2. segata
    segata ·

    This looks like a really awesome thing to try out, thanks for posting it :)

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