Old Color Negatives Brought Back to Life by the Smartphone Film Scanner

Seeing the shots you recently took with one of your cameras developed and printed or scanned is one of the great things about analogue photography. What might top even this feeling is being able to bring old negatives back to life. The Lomography Smartphone Film Scanner can do just that!

Most of us will have old film negatives in the attic, the basement or some drawer in our apartments or our parents’ place. Now you can bring these old treasures back to life with the Lomography Smartphone Film Scanner! Scanning any type of 35mm film has never been this fast and easy and you can instantly share these old shots from way back That’s exactly what guanatos did. Check out some of his vintage shots:

You can buy the scanner online or Find a Store

We already have other galleries of scans made with the Smartphone Film Scanner ready for you to check out. Here are sixsixty's gallery of scans, vgzalez's scans and wapclub's test scans.

You might also want to check out vgzalez’s review of the Smartphone Film Scanner. Check it out here.

The scans you can get with your Lomography Smartphone Scanner are even good enough quality to print.

written by bohlera on 2013-03-26 in #news

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