5 Tips for a New Analogue World!


If you haven't used a certain film before or haven't used a certain camera before, you might be interested in some easy tips that could make shooting film easier for you.

Sure, these are only a few tips, that cannot replace the experience, how to deal with your camera or film. Anyway they can be quite helpful to get along with a new old camera.

Black and White

Black and white films are not at all monotonous or old-school, even though they’ve been one of the first products available. Black and white film is a classic and especially handy for beginners. It’s much more than a regular film. This kind of film can be over- or underexposed about five stops without great loss of detail. Color negative film can only be over/underexposed three stops – color slide film only 1.5 stops. That’s why slide film is called “professional film” as an exact exposure is definitely needed. If you don’t know yet how your camera works or how generally an exposure is made, just opt for a black-and-white film – your exposure doesn’t need to be perfect.

Credits: alexgeek82, stouf, fiend & mephisto19

Light for your film

The best light for taking pictures is daylight. Morning light works best, but also afternoon is a great time for shooting. Bad lightning conditions are often hard to handle, due to harsh shadows that might show up. Your film is very likely to be underexposed and that’s our worst case scenario. Except your looking for that effect. Anyway in sunlight you can see if and where light leaks are visible and where your camera needs some tape, to prevent these – except you like it.

Credits: dreamseller, volker-jp, lucindadarling & graefin

“Sunny 16” rule

If you don’t know how a lightmeter works or if it’s broken, this tip can save your life: Set your aperture to f/16 and set the shutter speed to the reciprocal of your ISO rate.

Too difficult? Now, in detail. The aperture setting is f/16 on your lens, the shutter speed is set on your camera. The ISO rate is printed on both, your film and its package.

Now an example: Your film is 100 ISO, now set the aperture on f/16 and set the shutter speed on 1/100 or 1/125, according to your camera.

If your film is 400 ISO, set the aperture on f/16 and the shutter speed on 1/500. Sometimes there’s even a chart in the film box.


This technique is taught in photography classes and is quite useful, if you want to make sure, your image turns out. Basically you press the shutter, set a stop higher, press the shutter again. Now, set two stops lower (1 stop lower than the first exposure) and release the shutter for the last time. If you make also use of the “Sunny 16” rule and want a perfect exposure, your settings can look like this for example:

ISO 400
1. exposure at f/16, 1/500
2. exposure at f/22, 1/500
3. exposure at f/11, 1/500

5. Avoid portraits

I know it sounds horrible, but if you want to learn, how to handle your film or camera, you first need to make sure that you can take the perfect exposure. Be aware that portraits are quite difficult. You need a perfect exposure and a lot of light. You should know your camera first, before you start shooting portraits. But don’t be disappointed, if your images do not turn out the way you planned them.

Credits: earlybird & misskerosene

written by rainboow on 2012-07-12 in #gear #tipster #black-white #licht #belichtung #blenden #lomography #portraits #tipster #verschlusszeit #film #kamera #tips
translated by wolkers


  1. couchpotato
    couchpotato ·

    Helpful ideas and tips, thanks :)

  2. jasminfish
    jasminfish ·

    great pics!

  3. alex34
    alex34 ·

    I'm sorry but the advice on B&W films is wrong. SOME B&W films have enormous exposure latitude. Others deliberately have a very limited and specific exposure latitude, for example Ilford Pan F, which is ISO 50, or some Adox films with ISOs of 50 or 25. Expose them wrongly and you quickly know about it. Where there IS universal latitude I would say is in the process of chemical development-a degree extra in water bath temperature, or an extra minute developing, matter much less when developing B&W than when developing colour slide for example.

  4. chilledvondub
    chilledvondub ·

    i have to agree with @alex34 thats risky suggesting black and white to be safety film. I was running Fuji Acros 100 through my bronica at f22 1/250 ( Sunny ) and developed with fresh chemicals and wasn't pulled or pushed processed and the images still over exposed. So in theory that would suggest 2 of your tips in this entry are questionable. And i wouldn't recommend avoiding portraits either, a lot of professional films are developed solely for that purpose (e.g Kodak Portra, Fujicolor Pro 160c) and those films are most desirable. Not to mention depending on the camera shooting portraits requires exploring lighting and gauging DOF allowing people to become more familiar with the functionality of there camera. I'd say portraits are an essential component to developing your style and feel.

More Interesting Articles

  • On Seeing a Turquoise-Tinted World Through Pinhole Eyes

    written by Julien Matabuena on 2015-05-19 in #gear #lifestyle
    On Seeing a Turquoise-Tinted World Through Pinhole Eyes

    Or, that time when I braved using a camera and film combination that I haven't used before.

  • September 2015 Callout for Contributions

    written by Jill Tan Radovan on 2015-09-11 in #world #news
    September 2015 Callout for Contributions

    It's Tipstember! For this month, we will be awarding 25 fat piggies to every tipster article that gets published on the Lomography Magazine. You can share tips on composition, lighting, film experiments and camera modifications; or maybe techniques for shooting portraits, landscapes, still life and even wildlife! If you don't have tricks up your sleeve, however, you can still contribute to the Magazine and let your voice be heard. Here are some suggestions.

  • Shooting Squares with the LC-A 120

    written by pripri2000 on 2015-04-22 in #gear #news
    Shooting Squares with the LC-A 120

    Capture the world and all its contours in vibrant, wide-angled photographs any time, any where! The LC-A 120 is an adventure of its own with lots of exciting functions to experiment with, like seamless long exposures or full ISO control. It's also super-fast and ultra-compact - perfect for your everyday. If you're worried about the Medium Format film, don't be! You are free to use any 120 Film you want and there are plenty to choose from. In fact, that's what makes this camera so versatile! Scroll through this gallery for a little taste of the glorious shots this nifty invention is capable of.

  • Shop News

    Standard Photo Development Services

    Standard Photo Development Services

    Done shooting and want your films to be processed? We can process your colour and black & white 35mm, 120 or 110 films! Development, prints and scans are also included. (Service availability depends on your markets)

  • Handmade Cameras by Cedric Chatterley

    written by cheeo on 2014-12-05 in #lifestyle
    Handmade Cameras by Cedric Chatterley

    Shooting with film can be considered a labor of love. From carefully loading the film and adjusting for lighting conditions to the darkroom process, it’s a laborious process but certainly a fulfilling experience. What more if you created your own cameras?

  • A Round-up of Lomography Events Around the World in September

    written by dop on 2015-09-03 in #world #news #events
    A Round-up of Lomography Events Around the World in September

    If you are looking for some lomographic entertainment this month in your home city or if you are traveling the world and want some insider tips from our lomography teams, here’s a selection of what is going on in Lomography Gallery and Embassy Stores around the world.

  • Red and Green Doubles with the LC-A+

    written by hannah_brown on 2015-07-17 in #gear #tipster
    Red and Green Doubles with the LC-A+

    If you fancy a cheap and easy way to get some inspiring and unexpected analogue shots try shooting some red/green double exposures. Learn how to do this right here.

  • Shop News

    Give your space a facelift with your own analogue print

    Give your space a facelift with your own analogue print

    Really want to bring your film photos to life? We’re now offering totally analogue fine art prints in a host of large sizes and formats! Carefully enlarged from your negatives onto premium photographic paper by lab professionals, each picture is a unique piece of craftsmanship.

  • Reviews on Rewind: Lomography Color Negative 35mm 800 ISO

    written by chooolss on 2014-11-30 in #reviews
    Reviews on Rewind: Lomography Color Negative 35mm 800 ISO

    If you'd be shooting in low light, at night, or in any other situation that would require a high speed film for best results, why don't you try the Lomography Color Negative 800 for 35mm cameras? Allow five of our community members to convince you with their respective reviews in this installment of Reviews on Rewind.

  • WANTED: Lomography Magazine's Next Copywriting Editor

    written by lomographymagazine on 2015-11-03 in #world #news
    WANTED: Lomography Magazine's Next Copywriting Editor

    Lomography Magazine is looking for a new copywriting editor. If you have a knack for writing and an innate love for creative photography, you might just be the person we’re looking for. Applicants must be based in the Philippines.

  • Welcome to 365 Days of Lomography!

    written by Derek Woods on 2015-02-05 in #people #lifestyle
    Welcome to 365 Days of Lomography!

    Throughout this project I will be shooting with a variety of Lomography cameras to explore how they render the world in their own unique ways, as well as some tips and tricks I learn along the way.

  • Shop News

    Shoot recognizable images with the Petzval

    Shoot recognizable images with the Petzval

    You want your subject be the center of attention? Petzval lens photos are recognizable for sharpness and crispness in the centre, strong color saturation, wonderful swirly bokeh effect, artful vignettes and narrow depth of field that will make your subjects stand out!

  • The Lomo’Instant Wide "Share The News" Rumble

    written by Lomography on 2015-10-21 in #gear #competitions #videos
    The Lomo’Instant Wide "Share The News" Rumble

    If you’ve been living on Neptune for the past week (wait, how the hell did you get there?), you might have missed the memo – The brand new Lomo’Instant Wide has landed! Pre-orders are flying in for the world’s most creative wide format instant camera and lens system and we’ve decided to launch a competition to spice up the fun even further.

  • December 14th Advent Offer: Take Advantage of our Festive 3 For 2 Film Deals (Online Code: 3FOR2HOLIDAYFILM)

    written by jacobs on 2014-12-14 in #news
    December 14th Advent Offer: Take Advantage of our Festive 3 For 2 Film Deals  (Online Code: 3FOR2HOLIDAYFILM)

    Seeing that we love to spread the cheer around here, we're giving you another chance to load up on our awesome film with today's Advent deal! Choose a classy black and white film, like our Lady Grey, or get creative and colorful with one of our Redscale films. We're certain that no matter what you choose, you'll have a great time making memories with tons of lovely analogue photos this year!

  • Lantern Slides From the 'Psychic Photography From a New Angle' Series

    written by Julien Matabuena on 2015-07-01 in #world #lifestyle
    Lantern Slides From the 'Psychic Photography From a New Angle' Series

    Mysterious apparitions and other inexplicable phenomena on film, or generally speaking, for that matter, are as highly debated topics today as they were many decades ago. In 1934, a certain Mr. C.P. MacCarthy of 15 Wilkinson Street, Sheffield held a lecture at 76 Clarkehouse Road located in the same city to "demonstrate under test conditions Fake Psychic Photography" before an invited committee. MacCarthy's demonstration was accompanied by a series of photographs titled "Psychic Photography From a New Angle."