Redscale Tips: Various ISO Speeds


Inverting or buying already inverted film is the definition for creating red pictures from a color negative film. Here's a couple of tips to use when shooting it.

First, I previously talked about how to make my own redscale film with this article.

To shoot this film it’s a must to overexpose it by one or two stops. If it’s rated at ISO 200, shoot it at ISO 100 and so on. I found it best to use ISO 400 color negative film, because of the fact that you can experiment with it a lot, say rate it at ISO 200, 100 or 50 and get different results every time. Remember that the closest you shoot at rated speed, the redder your exposure will be.

If you have a Lomo LC-A+ (the meter starts at ISO 100) and you want to shoot at ISO 50, trick the meter by putting your finger in front of it and guesstimate your shutter speed. Mostly I think I shot at 50 or 25.

The rule is: The higher the ISO you expose at, the more red you’ll get. This being a Lomography CN ISO 100 these is the result for shooting it in redscale mode at 100 ISO:

If you have any other camera, you’re good to go.

written by pvalyk on 2012-02-14 in #gear #tipster #lomo #cn #redscale #35mm #color #film #negative #lca #tipster #120


  1. dogtanian
    dogtanian ·

    I like to shoot it two stops under, i prefer the yellows and oranges rather than the reds, everyone to there own though :D

  2. superkulisap
    superkulisap ·

    here's how to push your LCA+ to its limit. push it to ISO12… @renenob

  3. larrymcdowell
    larrymcdowell ·

    thank u very much for this interesting article! It was of great help!!

  4. sarah-addison-dobard
    sarah-addison-dobard ·

    I love your purple-ish shots, what ISO is that at? I have a Diana, so I would have to work with apertures, right? So the "cloudy" aperture would be more red and dark but the "sunny" setting less saturated?

  5. pvalyk
    pvalyk ·

    @sarah-addison-dobard The ISO is about 400 but I underexposed the film a bit. If you overexpose the film you get yellowish colors and so on. I recommend to start with a slow film, 50 ISO and inverting it, the ISO you should expose it should be 200 or 400. Use this guideline and you should know what to with it in your Diana. Also, for 120 film, I would recommend to get the 120 Redscale from Lomography, because it's hard to make a redscale film from a negative 120, but not impossible.
    Good luck with it.

  6. sarah-addison-dobard
    sarah-addison-dobard ·

    Ah okay thanks for the help! I'll let you know how it comes out!

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