Sprocket Holes: 135 Film in a 120 Roll


There are many ways of shooting with 135 in a 120 camera to sensitize the sprocket holes. This is an option in wich you can use the paper protection roll of 120 films.

The advantage of doing this is that you can leave your home with as many rolls as you want, and load your camera as it is a normal 120 film without needing a complex procedure in a dark room. Your 135 film won’t be unprotected inside the camera, and better: you will be able to use the numbers on the back of the paper to count the frames, saying a goodbye to the method of counting clicks that ends in failure.

With the paper on place, you can choose between the formats 4,5×6, 6×6 and even 6×9, depending on your camera. The materials that you need are:

  • 135 film roll
  • 120 empty film roll with protection paper
  • adhesive
  • dark room

I chose a12-frame ‘cause of it’s size, that is the closest to 120mm one. This way it yelds around nine 6×6 images. You can use a 24-frame film, but the photo counting will be on your own as the length of this film is bigger than the numbered part of the paper. It has to be done in the dark because the light “burns” your film.

First, find the place where the 120 film was fixed on it’s paper. It usually has a piece of adhesive paper on the black side. Unroll the 135 film with the 120 paper. It helps keeping them aligned.

When you reach the end, stretch it carefully and start to roll it with the 135 film in the middle, making a mini rocambole with paper and film. Finish with a piece of adhesive paper, so it won’t open itself and also for the identification of the film that is inside. And there is your 135 film for making sprocket holes in any 120 camera, with the advantage of the extra protection and can change the films without being in a dark room. Ah, and you have the paper number counting too!

To get it developed, it’s better putting it back on it’s original roll. Simple. If you want a redscale, just put the film the other way around. Have fun!

written by dux_x on 2012-01-12 in #gear #tipster #35mm-films #tipster #film #120-films #sprocket #top-tipster-techniques
translated by monamarques


  1. dearjme
    dearjme ·

    great ideas!

  2. iandevlinphoto
    iandevlinphoto ·

    I had been wondering if this would work thanks alot!

  3. mafiosa
    mafiosa ·

    Great idea.

  4. wuxiong
    wuxiong ·

    Hahaa... What a smart invention....<:) Thanks for sharing...<:)

  5. iamtheju
    iamtheju ·

    I really want to try this with 127 film. I just need to get hold of the film in the first place.

More Interesting Articles

  • Shooting Squares with the LC-A 120

    written by pripri2000 on 2015-04-22 in #gear #news
    Shooting Squares with the LC-A 120

    Capture the world and all its contours in vibrant, wide-angled photographs any time, any where! The LC-A 120 is an adventure of its own with lots of exciting functions to experiment with, like seamless long exposures or full ISO control. It's also super-fast and ultra-compact - perfect for your everyday. If you're worried about the Medium Format film, don't be! You are free to use any 120 Film you want and there are plenty to choose from. In fact, that's what makes this camera so versatile! Scroll through this gallery for a little taste of the glorious shots this nifty invention is capable of.

  • Lomo’Instant Quick Shots: Adriana Brioso

    written by hannah_brown on 2014-12-09 in #gear #tipster
    Lomo’Instant Quick Shots: Adriana Brioso

    There are so many exciting things you can do with the Lomo'instant camera, it's hard to know where to start. We've been giving this lovable Lomo camera the full test drive so that you can experience the full potential of this camera in an instant! Here are some top tips on shooting graffiti and doubles with our UK intern Adriana Brioso.

  • Falling In Love With The LC-A 120

    written by hannah_brown on 2015-04-06 in #gear #reviews
    Falling In Love With The LC-A 120

    There are quite a few perks that come with working for a film photography company, and the best perk of all is testing out the latest cameras. I can remember buying my LC-A back in 2009 and being really inspired to shoot film again. When the LC-A 120 came along, I couldn't wait to try it out around London. Join me as I test out this super medium format beauty.

  • Shop News

    Shoot recognizable images with the Petzval

    Shoot recognizable images with the Petzval

    You want your subject be the center of attention? Petzval lens photos are recognizable for sharpness and crispness in the centre, strong color saturation, wonderful swirly bokeh effect, artful vignettes and narrow depth of field that will make your subjects stand out!

  • Testing a Roll of Found Film

    written by billseye on 2015-07-20 in #gear #lifestyle
    Testing a Roll of Found Film

    In one of my vintage hunts, I bought a camera for $2. It came with an unexposed roll of film. After using up the last frames, I discovered that this old camera has Lomographic qualities.

  • 36 Reasons to shoot stunning squares with the LC-A 120

    written by camilla_illa on 2015-01-23 in #world #news
    36 Reasons to shoot stunning squares with the LC-A 120

    Why shoot square? ...Just take a second to look at these outstanding square photographs using the LC-A 120 and you will find out why! Selfies, silhouettes, walkways and winter landscapes are just a few of the themes featured in this spectacular photographic shortlist.

  • Cynthiaj and her Weapon of Choice: Holga 120 CFN

    written by icequeenubia on 2014-12-18 in #lifestyle
    Cynthiaj and her Weapon of Choice: Holga 120 CFN

    Cynthia prefers shooting multiple exposure photographs when using the Holga 120 CFN. In this installment of Weapon of Choice, she shares some of her beautiful monochromatic snapshots and a couple of tips when using this plastic shooter.

  • Shop News

    Diana Mini and Flash Petite Noire at 25% off

    Diana Mini and Flash Petite Noire at 25% off

    At 25% off you can take dreamy 35mm images with this little black beauty. Beam coloured light into your shots with its accompanying Diana Flash Back accessory and be the analogue king of the night.

  • Make the Most of Your LC-Wide!

    written by Alexandra Pillet on 2015-06-18 in #world #tipster
    Make the Most of Your LC-Wide!

    The LC-Wide: it's compact, but wide. It’s an amazing little beast that will adapt itself to all weathers, all kinds of film rolls. How to find more (crazy) ways to shoot with it? Here are a few ways!

  • Photo Stories: Away With You by lomomowlem

    written by Kwyn Kenaz Aquino on 2015-06-18 in #world #lifestyle
    Photo Stories: Away With You by lomomowlem

    It is clear from the wild variety of photos in the website that Lomographers will do just about anything to get a good shot. Some swap rolls with friends overseas while others concoct unheard-of film soups. And then there are the masters of operations, the ones who spy and crouch their way to a share-worthy picture. This is one such story.

  • A Salute to the Masters: Barkers (A Tribute to Jack Delano)

    written by sirio174 on 2015-05-02 in #world #lifestyle
    A Salute to the Masters: Barkers (A Tribute to Jack Delano)

    This is tribute to the Farm Security Administration photographer, Jack Delano, and his photographic series dedicated to barkers. For this article, I chose a series of photos I took this year at the traditional Easter Fair in my city, Como, using a classic rangefinder camera loaded with a roll of black and white film.

  • Shop News

    Standard Photo Development Services

    Standard Photo Development Services

    Done shooting and want your films to be processed? We can process your colour and black & white 35mm, 120 or 110 films! Development, prints and scans are also included. (Service availability depends on your markets)

  • Photographers On Why They Shoot Film (Part I)

    written by Julien Matabuena on 2015-04-11 in #people #lifestyle
    Photographers On Why They Shoot Film (Part I)

    On this day and age when many are incorporating digital gear into their workflows, whether fully or partly, there still are photographers who remain rooted to their analog roots and continue to shoot with film cameras. In commemoration of Film Photography Day happening tomorrow, we have scoured through our past interviews to highlight the reasons these photographers choose to still shoot film.

  • Uwe Mimoun: the Man Behind KONO! Reanimated Film

    written by bgaluppo on 2015-07-31 in #people #lifestyle
    Uwe Mimoun: the Man Behind KONO! Reanimated Film

    Branded as "The Reanimated Film," KONO! Film is hand-rolled and made of special materials which are rarely (or never) produced for "normal“ photography. Rather, the materials were intended for the motion picture industry and the results can vary depending on how the film is used. Learn more in this interview with the founder of KONO! Film, Uwe Mimoun.

  • Camera Collections: theonlydrp's Vintage and Handmade Gear

    written by Eunice Abique on 2015-09-20 in #world #lifestyle
    Camera Collections: theonlydrp's Vintage and Handmade Gear

    Some lomographers prefer to hoard as many analog cameras their shelves and budgets can support. Some would rather keep a manageable number that they can regularly shoot with. Community member Joshua Kennedy belongs to the latter group. From 40 cameras, he downsized his collection to 13, as he puts it, "really good ones" that suit his shooting habits and style. In this interview, he breaks down his small yet dependable arsenal of vintage and handmade cameras and how an organized schedule allows him to shoot with each one on a regular basis.