Day and Night Photos with the Lomography CN 800

2

You can use Lomography ISO 800 Colour negative high speed film to take photos during different times from day to night, and you will find that the effect is very different!

Using the Lomography CN 800 film , together with the convenient LC-A+, I tried to take photos indoors and outdoors during day time. The resulting photos turn out to be better than expected, especially those taken indoors. Under yellow lighting, it gives very good effects, and when you look closely the grains are acceptable too. Oh well, this is ISO 800 negative film after all. Having grains like these are reasonable.

Later on a rainy day when I took it out to the streets, I tried to see its effect during rainy days when the light is insufficient, and it turns out that the results are quite nice too! Although there are parts in which it still appears to be underexposed and the main object is still slightly dark (in fact it became a shadow), the picture is fine because the shape of the main object becomes very simple and the background becoming very clear. With the sky as the background, the fact that the main object becomes a shadow in such low light means that it is not a problem!

For other photos that are also taken during rainy days, their results are also much clearer than expected. Personally, if I can take such photos during rainy days, I think they are pretty good already.

Finally, I tried the hardest test, which is to take pictures in a place with extremely low light and with surroundings that are quite dark. It turns out that the result is far from satisfactory. In the photos, you can see that the ISO 800 films turn out quite clear for a light source, but anything behind the light source are just not acceptable. It clearly shows the problem of not having sufficient light would make the whole picture appears black. You also need to consider what your main theme (i.e. your main object) is. If your main theme is this:

Then there shouldn’t be too much problem because the main source is a brightly lit object. That’s why the main object turns out to be quite clear, and the dark background could put the focus back to the main object.

However, not every main object gives out light! Like this one, when the light is not focused, and with the ISO not high enough, the result is that the pictures look quite dark, and you cannot see the main object!

Of course, there are ways to solve this problem. For example, you can add release cable, tripod, gives it more shutter time, and the result would turn out better. However, if you are taking photos casually, and don’t want to take too many accessories, you need to carefully consider your main object and observe the light level.

Overall, Lomography CN 800 gives me the sense that it is a pretty good roll of film. You only need to observe the surrounding and light level carefully! Personally, I think that in places where there are insufficient light and in an indoor environment, it is not bad at all. However, if you are taking photos during night time, you may wish to add some accessories to ensure better results.

So, how do your resulting photos look like? Above is only a little piece of sharing on my part!

Lomography Color Negative 35mm 800 ISO is a type of high speed film which gives you vibrant colour. At the same time, it can perform well in all situation of different light level, giving it great saturation and high contrast. Try taking photos using Lomography Color Negative 35mm 800 ISO with a flash under the bright sun, on a cloudy day, indoor or at the night time!

written by bigbird on 2011-09-22 in #reviews

2 Comments

  1. freepeanuts
    freepeanuts ·

    just bought a pack of these, cant wait to try it out!

  2. shariff
    shariff ·

    Oh uh!!!!
    I just shot a roll of lomo cn 800 on my lc-a rl....
    Mostly indoors or night shots...

    Will b collecting the scans tomorrow.....
    I'm just really hoping the scans wont turn out too dark or way to grainy, like what i'm seeing here....

    :X

    Real good review though!
    ^_^

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