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A lame ass blog entry

I haven't blogged in awhile. Sometimes I'm in the mood and other times I feel like I'm just tooting hot air to anyone that will read the words I write. I'm in between road trips right now...the last one I did I still have a ton of film I need to develop from but my lab here only runs twice a week.

I love shooting roadside attractions and things that make you laugh or go “WTF” lol. I also like moody, dramatic, almost horror like images. I guess that makes me kind of a retro/rockabilly/goth kind of lomo girl I don’t know. Then there’s the architecture, the landscapes, the travel images. I feel the need to shoot every hotel in Vegas and the insides so it can be brochure-like. I’ll be at a roadside oddity and want to capture the same image in b/w, cross process and with different cameras.
I’m interested in doing portrait work but afraid to ask people to do it for me. I feel like I’m intruding when I get in their faces with a camera. How does one go about this “shooting shyness” as I call it?
Candid street photography is something I feel I could be good at, but when people stare at me with a camera and ask me to go away or not take pictures it’s pretty depressing. Anyone else have this experience? Discuss.

written by sthomas68

3 comments

  1. russheath

    russheath

    I struggle with this too, sometimes I see an interesting face but can't bring myself to take a shot (or ask for one). I think a lot of street photographers just gesture with their camera, kind of an implied question of "is this OK?" If the person turns away, then they clearly don't want a photo. But I think you would be surprised how many will allow it. I think it's also easier with Lomo cameras, because they look less imposing than some "serious" cameras . . . there's some free advice from someone who hasn't been able to do it himself! ;D

    about 3 years ago · report as spam
  2. rachaelbethan

    rachaelbethan

    I always go by the motto to shoot and ask after. Usually by the time they have are looking at me, I have the shot. Street photography is about capturing that one moment. Take it, ask questions later! Besides if they do look up, I find that a lot of the time it is easy to be a young, happy girl - I give them a big smile and shake my camera at them and usually they give me a huge grin back!

    about 3 years ago · report as spam
  3. sthomas68

    sthomas68

    I used to be better at grabbing pictures of things I wanted but were kind of considered taboo. But when security comes running or ppl get snarky it makes one a little gun shy so to speak. Sigh...lol I sure wish it was easier to take photos in this post 9/11 world...

    about 3 years ago · report as spam