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4x5 Test Shot

4x5 Test Shot

my first 4x5 shot. the frame is cropped a bit due to my scanner, so I think i'll have my lab scan it next time.

megaman49 This photo was shot on film. Taken by megaman49 with a linhof color kardan loaded with Kodak Commercial Internegative film in jber, ak, United States. These tags describe this photo: largeformat, linhof, internegative, kodak, crossprocess, xpro, e-6, 4x5, holga, indoor, studio, and reflection. Date: 2012-04-26. Time: Night. This photo can also be found in the album Large Format .

4 comments

  1. sarah-addison-dobard

    sarah-addison-dobard

    I have a GN too!i like the glass lens on the plastic camera.

    about 2 years ago · report as spam
  2. michaelmorse

    michaelmorse

    I just got a 4x5 camera today! I have access to a lot of free internegative film and have been searching for info on using it in camera (all I can find are posts by people saying not to). Can you tell me about your experience with it? Have you shot anything else? This photo has a pretty interesting color pallette, did you do your own processing?

    almost 2 years ago · report as spam
  3. megaman49

    megaman49

    @michaelmorse internegative film is just really slow (ISO 6 or so) color negative film with moderate saturation and a strong tungsten color correction. This shot was actually processed in E-6 chemistry and was exposed for about 8 min indoors under single photo floodlamp. About 2 stops more than I would have shot if my lab's C-41 machine for 4x5 worked. The slide without correction was almost solid magenta but after scanning I was able to bring it back to this with color balancing. If you process it C-41 this film will have a slight blue cast indoors and a strong blue cast outdoors. You can correct for the blue cast with a yellow filter. Exposures with this slow of a film are easiest with the "T" setting on the shutter unless you have a lot of light. I was just playing with this film to get practice with my 4x5 and this was the best shot I had. Other cheap films for large format are b&w duplication film and x-ray film if you can cut it down or find some in 4x5 (I suppose you could even load photo paper into the film holder if you wanted, like you might do with a pinhole camera). What type of camera are you using? Finding labs that still develop sheet film can be a pain; I moved to an area that doesn't have a good pro lab like the one I used for this shot. I have to figure out a good way to mail mine out without exposing the film to light.

    almost 2 years ago · report as spam
  4. michaelmorse

    michaelmorse

    Thanks so much for the information and sorry for taking so long to respond! I have a Kodak Premo Filmplate from around 1907 in beautiful condition. I have a box of Tri-X and Tmax to work with for now but may start experimenting soon with the internegative and photo paper. All the good photo labs around me were killed by digital so I'd have to mail out the internegative or get the chemicals to process it myself. I do my own b&w processing but c41 and e6 are a fiercer beast that I have yet to attempt to tame.

    over 1 year ago · report as spam

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