Likes

  • #15426316

    shared by dilma on 2012-02-23

  • #15426332

    shared by dilma on 2012-02-23

  • #15426337

    shared by dilma on 2012-02-23

  • #15426353

    shared by dilma on 2012-02-23

    1
  • #14684355

    shared by dilma on 2011-11-13

    1
  • #14684357

    shared by dilma on 2011-11-13

  • #15790955

    shared by dilma on 2012-04-11

  • #15790931

    shared by dilma on 2012-04-11

  • #15790935

    shared by dilma on 2012-04-11

  • #15790927

    shared by dilma on 2012-04-11

  • #15790920

    shared by dilma on 2012-04-11

  • #15512044

    shared by dilma on 2012-03-05

  • #15512048

    shared by dilma on 2012-03-05

  • #15512058

    shared by dilma on 2012-03-05

  • #15512061

    shared by dilma on 2012-03-05

  • #15512064

    shared by dilma on 2012-03-05

  • #15512069

    shared by dilma on 2012-03-05

  • #15512068

    shared by dilma on 2012-03-05

  • #15512073

    shared by dilma on 2012-03-05

  • #15512082

    shared by dilma on 2012-03-05

  • #15435979

    shared by dilma on 2012-02-24

  • #15435985

    shared by dilma on 2012-02-24

    1
  • #14789833

    shared by dilma on 2011-11-26

    1
  • #14789835

    shared by dilma on 2011-11-26

    3
  • #14789836

    shared by dilma on 2011-11-26

  • #16041106

    shared by polya206 on 2012-05-11

  • #11239052

    shared by lazara on 2010-04-20

    1
  • #11239035

    shared by lazara on 2010-04-20

    1
  • #11238966

    shared by lazara on 2010-04-20

  • #11163377

    shared by lazara on 2010-03-30

  • #6259667

    shared by lazara on 2009-12-20

    2
  • Olympus XA

    shared by zark on 2010-09-20

    http://www.lomography.de/magazine/reviews/2010/01/19/olympus-xa

    1
  • LC-A und Ilford Pan F+ 50 in Linz und Au an der…

    shared by zark on 2011-08-09

    Ferienfreizeit in Au an der Donau und Linz

    3
  • Lomo LC-A 1985

    shared by zark on 2011-02-01

    Reviews: http://www.lomography.com/magazine/reviews/2010/04/06/lomo-lc-a-sure-choice http://www.lomography.de/magazine/reviews/2009/11/16/lomo-lc-a

  • LC-Wide mit Vista 200 Iso...

    shared by zark on 2011-10-19

    ...bei Hagenbecks und am Willkommen-Höft in Wedel. This is one of my favourite lomographs because sometimes lomography is all about the camera. Without the LC-Wides wide lens and the possibility to shoot without using the viewfinder, the elephant would already have snatched the carrot before I would have been ready to shoot. Go close or go away!

    9
  • Colorsplash Camera

    shared by zark on 2010-01-05

    http://www.lomography.de/magazine/reviews/2010/03/11/lomography-colorsplash-kamera-party-kamera

    2
  • Velocity

    shared by zark on 2009-02-10

    Going fast, freezing time. Movement, momentum. This is one of my favourite lomographs ever, because I didn´t know how it would turn out until I got my photos back from the lab. I did not think about the outcome when I shot it. I just took it. Don´t think, just shoot!

    53
  • #2463932

    shared by lazara on 2009-06-16

    30
  • spring doubles

    shared by neja on 2011-04-20

    Saatchi & Saatchi gallery, Kew Gardens botanical gardens, Soho

    14
  • #12631715

    shared by pussylove on 2011-02-16

    Awesome exhibition @ Mori Museum Tokyo of Odani Motohiko... I feel in love with the wolves dress...

    30
  • #103402

    shared by paper_doll on 2008-11-16

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  • #12772106

    shared by bravebird on 2011-03-10

    36
  • bambi

    shared by wil6ka on 2008-04-22

    Nara is one of the old capitals of the Japanese empire. And a special one. There are many mysterious traditions lingering around the Japanese Island like this one: Due to Shinto-Tradition every time an emperor died the capital had to be changed, hence death was sticking to the old royal walls. This is kind of funny because Japan isn’t such a massive continent were you can randomly chose a town to be the main city: With the uprising of Buddhism this supersticion lost its grip and in 710 Nara was declared the first real capital of Japan. Some of the historic sites are still alive and kicking in Nara and eight of them met the UNESCO world heritage criteria in 1998, which makes this little town one of the must-see destinations. There is one place, though, which really will rock your world in Nara: Nara-Koen. This giant Park takes up a large part of the whole city and was created in 1880 on top of wasteland. Nonetheless it is home to many historic temples and religious sites. The thing that is most striking about the park is, that it is inhabited by deer. More than 1200 deers live their lives on the greens, the stones and streets of the park. It is an awkward encounter, when one is entering the park and the animals are next to you and you are the visitor. There are no fences and borders, you just have to get along. In Shinto-times deers were said to be gods and that is the origin of the whole thing: And hey, if they have rat-temples in India, they can surely build a big living room for these fellows: For 150 yen you can buy special deer-biscuits and feed them to the furries. And you better them, because they know the game and demand the payment for the spectacle. Watch out for the little ones, because some of the mean deer like to stub children in the sand, just because it is fun for them. Which creates some even bigger spectacle, when mean parents are keen on mean deer

  • bambi

    shared by wil6ka on 2008-03-09

    Nara is one of the old capitals of the Japanese empire. And a special one. There are many mysterious traditions lingering around the Japanese Island like this one: Due to Shinto-Tradition every time an emperor died the capital had to be changed, hence death was sticking to the old royal walls. This is kind of funny because Japan isn’t such a massive continent were you can randomly chose a town to be the main city: With the uprising of Buddhism this supersticion lost its grip and in 710 Nara was declared the first real capital of Japan. Some of the historic sites are still alive and kicking in Nara and eight of them met the UNESCO world heritage criteria in 1998, which makes this little town one of the must-see destinations. There is one place, though, which really will rock your world in Nara: Nara-Koen. This giant Park takes up a large part of the whole city and was created in 1880 on top of wasteland. Nonetheless it is home to many historic temples and religious sites. The thing that is most striking about the park is, that it is inhabited by deer. More than 1200 deers live their lives on the greens, the stones and streets of the park. It is an awkward encounter, when one is entering the park and the animals are next to you and you are the visitor. There are no fences and borders, you just have to get along. In Shinto-times deers were said to be gods and that is the origin of the whole thing: And hey, if they have rat-temples in India, they can surely build a big living room for these fellows: For 150 yen you can buy special deer-biscuits and feed them to the furries. And you better them, because they know the game and demand the payment for the spectacle. Watch out for the little ones, because some of the mean deer like to stub children in the sand, just because it is fun for them. Which creates some even bigger spectacle, when mean parents are keen on mean deer

  • bambi

    shared by wil6ka on 2008-03-09

    Nara is one of the old capitals of the Japanese empire. And a special one. There are many mysterious traditions lingering around the Japanese Island like this one: Due to Shinto-Tradition every time an emperor died the capital had to be changed, hence death was sticking to the old royal walls. This is kind of funny because Japan isn’t such a massive continent were you can randomly chose a town to be the main city: With the uprising of Buddhism this supersticion lost its grip and in 710 Nara was declared the first real capital of Japan. Some of the historic sites are still alive and kicking in Nara and eight of them met the UNESCO world heritage criteria in 1998, which makes this little town one of the must-see destinations. There is one place, though, which really will rock your world in Nara: Nara-Koen. This giant Park takes up a large part of the whole city and was created in 1880 on top of wasteland. Nonetheless it is home to many historic temples and religious sites. The thing that is most striking about the park is, that it is inhabited by deer. More than 1200 deers live their lives on the greens, the stones and streets of the park. It is an awkward encounter, when one is entering the park and the animals are next to you and you are the visitor. There are no fences and borders, you just have to get along. In Shinto-times deers were said to be gods and that is the origin of the whole thing: And hey, if they have rat-temples in India, they can surely build a big living room for these fellows: For 150 yen you can buy special deer-biscuits and feed them to the furries. And you better them, because they know the game and demand the payment for the spectacle. Watch out for the little ones, because some of the mean deer like to stub children in the sand, just because it is fun for them. Which creates some even bigger spectacle, when mean parents are keen on mean deer

  • bambi

    shared by wil6ka on 2008-02-10

    Nara is one of the old capitals of the Japanese empire. And a special one. There are many mysterious traditions lingering around the Japanese Island like this one: Due to Shinto-Tradition every time an emperor died the capital had to be changed, hence death was sticking to the old royal walls. This is kind of funny because Japan isn’t such a massive continent were you can randomly chose a town to be the main city: With the uprising of Buddhism this supersticion lost its grip and in 710 Nara was declared the first real capital of Japan. Some of the historic sites are still alive and kicking in Nara and eight of them met the UNESCO world heritage criteria in 1998, which makes this little town one of the must-see destinations. There is one place, though, which really will rock your world in Nara: Nara-Koen. This giant Park takes up a large part of the whole city and was created in 1880 on top of wasteland. Nonetheless it is home to many historic temples and religious sites. The thing that is most striking about the park is, that it is inhabited by deer. More than 1200 deers live their lives on the greens, the stones and streets of the park. It is an awkward encounter, when one is entering the park and the animals are next to you and you are the visitor. There are no fences and borders, you just have to get along. In Shinto-times deers were said to be gods and that is the origin of the whole thing: And hey, if they have rat-temples in India, they can surely build a big living room for these fellows: For 150 yen you can buy special deer-biscuits and feed them to the furries. And you better them, because they know the game and demand the payment for the spectacle. Watch out for the little ones, because some of the mean deer like to stub children in the sand, just because it is fun for them. Which creates some even bigger spectacle, when mean parents are keen on mean deer

  • Soulful

    shared by wil6ka on 2011-11-20

    Nina Park

    5
  • Photokina 2010

    shared by shoujoai on 2010-09-28

    During the photokina 2010, the Hasselblade booth offers to photographers to try out their cameras and to shoot some great models. Luckily, also lots of other photographers around (like me) had the possibility to take some picturs with their own cameras! I went there many times to see all the models in different dresses and love the results with Diana. The scenerie was done by the photograph Tom Hagemeyer from France.

    34
  • Umbrella

    shared by phiphu on 2010-06-27

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  • Balloon Race II

    shared by megs79 on 2010-09-23

    Underexposed multi layered photo. I can imagine there is a true sense of wonder and isolation soaring above the clouds in a baloon looking down on Earth. There are a lot of reasons this lomograph is one of my favorites. It is my most popular lomograph. It is a double exposure and I love doubles. I also love hot air balloons and hope to one day ride in one.

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