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  • Flipping Over the Brownie Hawkeye: Advanced Lomographic Techniques With America’s Favorite Camera

    Flipping Over the Brownie Hawkeye:  Advanced Lomographic Techniques With America’s Favorite Camera
    Do you like soft focus? Or soft focus surround? Then check out the Kodak Brownie Hawkeye camera.
  • Invite “Bob” Into Your Life (And Into Your Camera!)

    Invite “Bob” Into Your Life (And Into Your Camera!)
    Like a lot of you, I've been carrying my cardboard cutout of Bob in my camera bag for the last few months looking for locations and backdrops that would reveal Bob at his best. And, like a lot of you, I have become frustrated at times with Bob’s fickle nature as he’s swept away by wind, waves, or friendly dogs. So when Lomography and Have You Seen Bob joined to sponsor a Have You Seen Bob photo contest, I knew that I wanted to shoot Bob again but I also knew that I wanted it to be different than before.
  • Beyond the Blues: Van Dyke Brown Printing

    Beyond the Blues:  Van Dyke Brown Printing
    Many of the most popular alternative processes in use today are variants of the non-silver processes developed by Sir John Herschel in 1842 and they are among the oldest of all photographic processes. The first of these, cyanotypes, was previously discussed in a recent tipster -- "Beat the Blues: Making Cyanotypes". Another process, Van Dyke Brown Printing, is nearly identical in simplicity, low cost technique but yields a rich brown color as opposed to the blue of cyanotypes. But, if you'll ask me, why not do both? Check it out.
  • Beat the Blues: Making Cyanotypes

    Beat the Blues:  Making Cyanotypes
    Cyanotypes are fun and easy and are the perfect way to begin your exploration of alternative and historical photographic processes. The chemicals involved are inexpensive and relatively safe and most of the preparation can be done under normal room lighting. So what’s not to like? Let’s beat those blues! Many places sell readymade cyanotype kits or even pre-sensitized paper (remember SunPrint?). Look for them online or at photo shops that cater to analog photographers such as Freestyle Photographic Supplies in Los Angeles or Bostick and Sullivan in Santa Fe, New Mexico. It’s by far the easiest way to go but if you are more adventuresome and want to do it yourself then I’ve got you covered there, also.
  • Fuji Natura Classica

    Fuji Natura Classica
    Shoot indoors, at night, with no flash! Nighttime photography with ambient light! Stealth photography--street scenes grabbed without flash! Really, it sounds too good to be true...and the write-up on the Fuji Natura Classica is a little duh!
  • Diana Multi Pinhole Operator: Multi Image Madness

    Diana Multi Pinhole Operator:  Multi Image Madness
    I'm a sucker for pinhole cameras so when the Diana Multi Pinhole Operator showed up at the Lomography store awhile back, I knew I had to have one.
  • Palace of Fine Arts, San Francisco

    Palace of Fine Arts, San Francisco
    The Palace of Fine Arts was constructed for the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition to house the works of fine arts exhibits. It was a temporary structure made of plaster and burlap and was meant to be torn down after the Exposition along with the other temporary structures, but it was so beloved that a committee was formed immediately for its preservation and with their efforts, saved it from destruction. Today, after extensive renovations, one can appreciate the grace and beauty of the structure with its iconic golden domed rotunda reflected in the surrounding pool, the rows of Corinthian columns flanking it, and the Ancient Greek and Roman inspired architecture and sculpture.
  • Chinatown, San Francisco, California

    Chinatown, San Francisco, California
    San Francisco’s Chinatown is the largest community of Chinese immigrants and Chinese descendants outside of Asia and also the oldest, dating from 1848. Thousands of Chinese immigrants came to California during the last half of the 1800s as a source of cheap labor for mining and building railroads and levies. Today, Chinatown is one of San Francisco’s most popular tourist attractions attracting even more visitors than the Golden Gate Bridge.
  • Ansco Craftsman: A Box Camera From The 1950s Still Relevant Today

    Ansco Craftsman:  A Box Camera From The 1950s Still Relevant Today
    Although box cameras have been around since the 1820s, it wasn’t until 1888 that Kodak introduced the first commercially successful box camera using roll film, box cameras to that point used plates such as wet plate collodion or tintype.
  • Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco, California

    Hyde Street Pier, San Francisco, California
    Before the Golden Gate Bridge opened in 1937, the only way to reach Marin County, north of San Francisco, was by boat. The Hyde Street Pier was built in 1922 to accommodate automobile and passenger ferries between San Francisco and Sausalito. In 1988, the Hyde Street Pier became the centerpiece of the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park and home to numerous historical vessels, some fully restored to their original beauty and others currently undergoing restoration.
  • Seeking Inspiration, Part 1: A Favorite Landmark

    Seeking Inspiration, Part 1:  A Favorite Landmark
    Do you sometimes feel that you just have to get out and burn some film for nothing else but the sheer joy of framing an image and clicking the shutter? I know that I do and sometimes I'm not sure what I want to shoot or where I want to go but I have found over time that there are some things that are just plain inspirational and will always get me happily clicking away. One such for me is an old oak tree standing alone in a field.
  • The Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, California

    The Golden Gate Bridge, San Francisco, California
    It's considered as one of the Seven Wonders of the Modern World and its beautiful and graceful lines stretches between San Francisco and Marin County to the north - in perfect harmony with it's setting. Taken together, the bridge and the Golden Gate framing, the San Francisco skyline is one of the most awe-inspiring sights on earth and certainly one of the most photographed. One can only envy early travelers arriving in San Francisco by ship and what emotion they must have felt.
  • Along the Oregon Coast, Cannon Beach, and Haystack Rock

    Along the Oregon Coast, Cannon Beach, and Haystack Rock
    Highway US 101 parallels the coast of Oregon, sometimes only a few meters from the breaking waves and never more than a few kilometers distant and as the Oregon Coast is generally considered to be among the most beautiful in the world, the drive along US 101 is an epic road trip. July of this summer my wife and I, along with our two dogs, loaded up our classic 1988 motor home and spent several days exploring the Oregon Coast. Among the most spectacular of the sights was Haystack Rock, located in Cannon Beach.
  • Pentax Auto 110: the World's Smallest SLR!

    Pentax Auto 110:  the World's Smallest SLR!
    When Pentax introduced its Auto 110 SLR camera in late 1978 it caught the world by surprise. It was incredibly small, cute even, and it was a true SLR with TTL (through-the-lens) center weighted metering and interchangeable lenses.
  • Rollei A110: One of the Best Subminiature Cameras

    Rollei A110:  One of the Best Subminiature Cameras
    The Rollei is a small, well-built camera with a lot of heft and nice clean lines. Unlike most 110 cameras, it is mostly metal with a few plastic parts such as the shutter button, focusing lever, and battery holder.
  • Zeiss Ikon Box-Tengor

    Zeiss Ikon Box-Tengor
    Travel back to the earliest days of point and shoot photography--long before Lomography was born. Box cameras were introduced by Kodak in 1900 and became a favorite of amateur photographers for their simplicity and their unique images and are the clear precursor to Diana and Holga cameras we use today.
  • Salton Sea Beach-Vision of the Apocalypse

    Salton Sea Beach-Vision of the Apocalypse
    Set in a stark and barren landscape in the deserts of Southern California the Salton Sea was created by an environmental disaster in 1905 when the Colorado River overflowed its banks and flowed across the desert and into the Salton Sink, a prehistoric lakebed. By the time the river was contained, nearly two years later, the lake covered an area of about 376 square miles. Today, another environmental disaster is killing the lake along with the dreams of those who live there.
  • Rush Creek Trail

    Rush Creek Trail
    Rush Creek Trail is really just a dusty old fire road that skirts a tidal marsh. It’s flat and at about 4 miles to the end and back is popular for beginning cyclists, joggers, and families out for a stroll with their dogs. Because of it's open vistas and wildlife; It's also great for photographers.