Likes

  • Making a Slit Scan Camera

    written by stratski on 2014-07-31 in #gear #tipster
    Making a Slit Scan Camera

    Looking for a fun new experiment? Like those old fashioned finish photos? Then let me introduce you to the wondrous world of slit scan photography.

    3
  • Analogue Bucket List: 12 Months, 12 Projects

    written by stratski on 2015-01-14 in #lifestyle
    Analogue Bucket List: 12 Months, 12 Projects

    January is always packed with good resolutions, most of which get broken even before the month is over. This year, I have decided to rework my resolutions into a bucket list of monthly projects.

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  • No fun at the funfair

    shared by fruchtzwerg_hh on 2014-12-23

    another grey november day in hamburg and no fun, not even at the funfair....

    2
  • Stonehenge Revolver

    shared by buckshot on 2015-01-10

    Shot on a frosty and overcast winter morning on 220 roll film in my homemade Buckshot EBS Revolver camera. More details here: http://goo.gl/VeOllX

  • Stonehenge Revolver

    shared by buckshot on 2015-01-10

    Shot on a frosty and overcast winter morning on 220 roll film in my homemade Buckshot EBS Revolver camera. More details here: http://goo.gl/VeOllX

    1
  • Stonehenge Revolver

    shared by buckshot on 2015-01-10

    Shot on a frosty and overcast winter morning on 220 roll film in my homemade Buckshot EBS Revolver camera. More details here: http://goo.gl/VeOllX

    1
  • Stonehenge Revolver

    shared by buckshot on 2015-01-10

    Shot on a frosty and overcast winter morning on 220 roll film in my homemade Buckshot EBS Revolver camera. More details here: http://goo.gl/VeOllX

    1
  • The Non-Catholic Cemetery

    shared by ophelia on 2015-01-06

    According to the ecclesiastical laws of the Catholic Church, Protestants can be buried neither in Catholic churches nor in consecrated ground. Nevertheless, burial places for non-Catholics came into use comparatively early in some much-visited Italian harbour cities, such as Livorno (from 1598) and Venice (from 1684). There are also non-Catholic cemeteries in Florence and Bagni di Lucca. The Cemetery for non-Catholics in Rome dates back to at least 1716 when records show that members of the Stuart Court in exile from England were allowed by Pope Clement XI to be buried in front of the Pyramid. Other non-Catholics, many of them young people on the Grand Tour, were also allowed to be buried here. The land then and now is adjacent to two ancient monuments – the Pyramid of Caius Cestius dating to approximately 12 B.C. and the Aurelian city wall - that form an impressive backdrop for the Cemetery. The earliest grave of which traces have been found is that of George Langton, an Oxford graduate, who died in 1738. His remains, covered by a lead shield, were found in 1929 during excavations. The first North American (eighteen year-old Ruth McEvers) was buried in 1803 and in the same year Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Humboldt, Prussian minister resident in Rome, buried his nine-year-old son Wilhelm. Between 1738 and 1822 more than sixty people were buried in that area. In 1821 the Pope forbade further burials in front of the Pyramid and granted instead an adjoining area of land which was surrounded with a wall (the “New Cemetery”). In 1824 the Holy See gave permission for a protective moat to be dug around the Old Cemetery. The New Cemetery was twice enlarged during the 19th century. The second and last extension in 1894 gave it the dimensions and scale that it occupies today. A chapel was built in 1898. In 1910 a formal agreement with the Mayor of Rome, Ernesto Nathan, defined the Cemetery as culturally important and thus to enjoy special protection. In 1918 it was declared: "Zona Monumentale d’Interesse Nazionale".

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  • The Non-Catholic Cemetery

    shared by ophelia on 2015-01-06

    According to the ecclesiastical laws of the Catholic Church, Protestants can be buried neither in Catholic churches nor in consecrated ground. Nevertheless, burial places for non-Catholics came into use comparatively early in some much-visited Italian harbour cities, such as Livorno (from 1598) and Venice (from 1684). There are also non-Catholic cemeteries in Florence and Bagni di Lucca. The Cemetery for non-Catholics in Rome dates back to at least 1716 when records show that members of the Stuart Court in exile from England were allowed by Pope Clement XI to be buried in front of the Pyramid. Other non-Catholics, many of them young people on the Grand Tour, were also allowed to be buried here. The land then and now is adjacent to two ancient monuments – the Pyramid of Caius Cestius dating to approximately 12 B.C. and the Aurelian city wall - that form an impressive backdrop for the Cemetery. The earliest grave of which traces have been found is that of George Langton, an Oxford graduate, who died in 1738. His remains, covered by a lead shield, were found in 1929 during excavations. The first North American (eighteen year-old Ruth McEvers) was buried in 1803 and in the same year Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Humboldt, Prussian minister resident in Rome, buried his nine-year-old son Wilhelm. Between 1738 and 1822 more than sixty people were buried in that area. In 1821 the Pope forbade further burials in front of the Pyramid and granted instead an adjoining area of land which was surrounded with a wall (the “New Cemetery”). In 1824 the Holy See gave permission for a protective moat to be dug around the Old Cemetery. The New Cemetery was twice enlarged during the 19th century. The second and last extension in 1894 gave it the dimensions and scale that it occupies today. A chapel was built in 1898. In 1910 a formal agreement with the Mayor of Rome, Ernesto Nathan, defined the Cemetery as culturally important and thus to enjoy special protection. In 1918 it was declared: "Zona Monumentale d’Interesse Nazionale".

  • The Non-Catholic Cemetery

    shared by ophelia on 2015-01-06

    According to the ecclesiastical laws of the Catholic Church, Protestants can be buried neither in Catholic churches nor in consecrated ground. Nevertheless, burial places for non-Catholics came into use comparatively early in some much-visited Italian harbour cities, such as Livorno (from 1598) and Venice (from 1684). There are also non-Catholic cemeteries in Florence and Bagni di Lucca. The Cemetery for non-Catholics in Rome dates back to at least 1716 when records show that members of the Stuart Court in exile from England were allowed by Pope Clement XI to be buried in front of the Pyramid. Other non-Catholics, many of them young people on the Grand Tour, were also allowed to be buried here. The land then and now is adjacent to two ancient monuments – the Pyramid of Caius Cestius dating to approximately 12 B.C. and the Aurelian city wall - that form an impressive backdrop for the Cemetery. The earliest grave of which traces have been found is that of George Langton, an Oxford graduate, who died in 1738. His remains, covered by a lead shield, were found in 1929 during excavations. The first North American (eighteen year-old Ruth McEvers) was buried in 1803 and in the same year Baron Friedrich Wilhelm von Humboldt, Prussian minister resident in Rome, buried his nine-year-old son Wilhelm. Between 1738 and 1822 more than sixty people were buried in that area. In 1821 the Pope forbade further burials in front of the Pyramid and granted instead an adjoining area of land which was surrounded with a wall (the “New Cemetery”). In 1824 the Holy See gave permission for a protective moat to be dug around the Old Cemetery. The New Cemetery was twice enlarged during the 19th century. The second and last extension in 1894 gave it the dimensions and scale that it occupies today. A chapel was built in 1898. In 1910 a formal agreement with the Mayor of Rome, Ernesto Nathan, defined the Cemetery as culturally important and thus to enjoy special protection. In 1918 it was declared: "Zona Monumentale d’Interesse Nazionale".

    1
  • Testing a "new" Pentacon 29 mm lens

    shared by baxaviv on 2015-01-06

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  • Testing a "new" Pentacon 29 mm lens

    shared by baxaviv on 2015-01-06

  • Testing a "new" Pentacon 29 mm lens

    shared by baxaviv on 2015-01-06

  • #20196561

    shared by kylethefrench on 2014-12-23

    love the summer

  • Spice Up Your Lomo'Instant Snaps with a Cool Collage

    written by jacobs on 2014-12-15 in #gear #tipster
    Spice Up Your Lomo'Instant Snaps with a Cool Collage

    As you may have noticed, we love finding awesome ways to show off our Lomo'Instant snaps. That's why any time we come across a new and cool method, we just have to share it. Scroll down to see how you can display your instants in a beautiful collage style!

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  • #20179856

    shared by cryboy on 2014-12-12

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  • Japanese Red Autumn by Petzval Lens

    shared by gocchin on 2014-12-11

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  • Japanese Red Autumn by Petzval Lens

    shared by gocchin on 2014-12-11

  • .

    shared by alienmeatsack on 2014-12-06

    This roll of Kentmere broke off inside of my Horizon 202 sadly, and I had a really difficult time getting it out of the camera. THen it got bent in the light proof container I put it into before I shot. So I just figured what the heck and I stuffed it into the developing tank with no reel and developed it with some Dektol 1+3 for about 4 minutes. Some of the film was touching other parts of the film when developing so I got some interesting stuff happening in the shots.

  • Pere Lachaise Cemetery

    shared by dudizm on 2014-12-06

    1
  • Turn! Turn! Turn! (The Byrds)

    shared by buckshot on 2012-12-22

    Double-exposure album: first layer was sheet music from my guitar books I scanned and inverted (to make white notes/lyrics on black background) then shot on my computer screen at f3.5, shutter speed 1/2s; second layer was various musical instruments and equipment I have around my house, shot with indoor lighting at f3.5–f5.6, shutter speed 1/15–1/1s.

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  • Paranoid Android (Radiohead)

    shared by buckshot on 2012-12-22

    Double-exposure album: first layer was sheet music from my guitar books I scanned and inverted (to make white notes/lyrics on black background) then shot on my computer screen at f3.5, shutter speed 1/2s; second layer was various musical instruments and equipment I have around my house, shot with indoor lighting at f3.5–f5.6, shutter speed 1/15–1/1s.

    2
  • #19097275

    shared by mrpenta on 2013-11-06

    2
  • #19869885

    shared by mrpenta on 2014-08-03

  • Chiptunes!

    shared by shufi on 2014-12-02

    2
  • Keys

    shared by natalieerachel on 2012-02-03

    Tried a negative doubles tipster I read a while ago; came out great! Had another go at the galaxy doubles, those also came out nicely! Thus; negative space...get it?? Haha :)

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  • The Lomography Hipshot Showdown: Music and Lomography

    written by icequeenubia on 2014-11-29 in #competitions
    The Lomography Hipshot Showdown: Music and Lomography

    Be in tune with your favorite analogue camera and inpsire us with your music-themed lomographs!

    2
  • The Daily Hex: Dodger Blue

    written by icequeenubia on 2014-12-01 in #news
    The Daily Hex: Dodger Blue

    Baseball fans will surely get a kick out of today's featured color.

  • between sky and sand

    shared by jean_louis_pujol on 2014-12-01

    1
  • Awesome Albums: Splitzed EBSi by maria_vlachou

    written by chooolss on 2014-11-23 in #news
    Awesome Albums: Splitzed EBSi by maria_vlachou

    For a first attempt at this awesome analogue technique, maria_vlachou sure did a fine job at taking her own EBS shots!

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  • EBS first attempt

    shared by maria_vlachou on 2014-11-03

    everything thanks to the brilliant @hodachrome and his amazing tipster http://www.lomography.com/magazine/tipster/2013/01/14/tipster-how-to-take-symmetrical-images-with-exposing-both-sides-of-the-film-ebs

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  • Marilyn Monroe's Personal Handwritten Turkey Dinner Recipe

    written by chooolss on 2014-11-23 in #lifestyle
    Marilyn Monroe's Personal Handwritten Turkey Dinner Recipe

    Here's one awesome recipe for this holiday staple courtesy of no less than the legendary Hollywood star herself, just in time for the upcoming Thanksgiving!

  • #20035298

    shared by lomolta on 2014-10-06

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  • #20142169

    shared by clickiemcpete on 2014-11-21

    Some Instax from the late summer...

    1
  • LomoWall Your Likes: Dreamy Diana

    written by icequeenubia on 2014-11-22 in #competitions
    LomoWall Your Likes: Dreamy Diana

    Love the soft and lo-fi looks of Diana F+ photographs? Hop on and join our latest LomoWall Your Likes rumble!

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  • #20102318

    shared by kylethefrench on 2014-11-02

    nice weather

  • #20102303

    shared by kylethefrench on 2014-11-02

    nice weather

  • #20102326

    shared by kylethefrench on 2014-11-02

    nice weather

  • #20092776

    shared by kylethefrench on 2014-10-30

    all of it

  • #20092775

    shared by kylethefrench on 2014-10-30

    all of it

  • #20122165

    shared by kylethefrench on 2014-11-12

    Halloween times

  • #20122167

    shared by kylethefrench on 2014-11-12

    Halloween times

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  • #20122147

    shared by kylethefrench on 2014-11-12

    Halloween times

  • #20122148

    shared by kylethefrench on 2014-11-12

    Halloween times

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  • #20126954

    shared by emerymott on 2014-11-14

  • #20115348

    shared by gakurou on 2014-11-09

  • My Lomo’Instant Quick Tips

    written by tomas_bates on 2014-11-12 in #gear #tipster
    My Lomo’Instant Quick Tips

    I backed the Kickstarter project for the Lomo’Instant earlier this year and was thrilled to receive it last week. I love how the camera naturally encourages you to experiment with its different features, whether it’s through flashing your multiple exposures with different colors or trying different creative techniques after your shots has been ejected. Here are a few tips from what I’ve discovered from playing with the camera so far (and a couple of tips I want to try out in future)!

  • Lomo LC-A Instant Back+ Ruined Effect!

    written by cruzron on 2010-03-29 in #gear #tipster
    Lomo LC-A Instant Back+ Ruined Effect!

    have you ever been curious how to make those gritty, lo-fi, "ruined" instant photos? Well, there's no need for photoshop if you know Ron Lau of Lomography Hong Kong's secret tipster on doing it right!

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  • #20119882

    shared by roman_sekatsky on 2014-11-11

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  • *

    shared by pearlgirl77 on 2014-11-10

    1