Likes

  • Strange camera - MotorMarine II

    shared by freshmeat_omd on 2012-09-09

  • Strange camera - MotorMarine II

    shared by freshmeat_omd on 2012-09-09

  • Strange camera - MotorMarine II

    shared by freshmeat_omd on 2012-09-09

  • Strange camera - MotorMarine II

    shared by freshmeat_omd on 2012-09-09

  • Diana F+ 05/2012 (I)

    shared by drame on 2012-09-09

    Vacaciones en familia por Bretaña

  • Diana F+ 05/2012 (I)

    shared by drame on 2012-09-09

    Vacaciones en familia por Bretaña

  • Spinner 05/2012

    shared by drame on 2012-09-09

    Vacaciones en familia.

    2
  • Diana F+ 05/2012 (I)

    shared by drame on 2012-09-09

    Vacaciones en familia por Bretaña

    1
  • Diana F+ 05/2012 (I)

    shared by drame on 2012-09-09

    Vacaciones en familia por Bretaña

  • Family holidays with Ilford FP4+

    shared by freshmeat_omd on 2012-09-09

  • Family holidays with Ilford FP4+

    shared by freshmeat_omd on 2012-09-09

  • Family holidays with Ilford FP4+

    shared by freshmeat_omd on 2012-09-09

  • Family holidays with Ilford FP4+

    shared by freshmeat_omd on 2012-09-09

  • Family holidays with Ilford FP4+

    shared by freshmeat_omd on 2012-09-09

  • Family holidays with Ilford FP4+

    shared by freshmeat_omd on 2012-09-09

  • #16601977

    shared by lakandula on 2012-07-23

    If you think Material Girl Madonna is the original master of constant self-reinvention and Fame Monster Lady Gaga is a mere copycat, you may start counting years back to pre-war Hollywood in the era of silent films to determine who is really the queen of character fabrication. These two contemporary pop icons must have found inspiration in Marlene Dietrich (27 December 1901 – 6 May 1992) - a German-American actress and singer. The constant birth and rebirth of her persona (such as being femme fatale and androgynous) both professionally and characteristically made Dietrich popular throughout her long career since being discovered as a stage performer and silent film actress in Berlin. Her stellar performance as the character Lola-Lola in Josef von Sternberg's The Blue Angel catapulted her into international stardom paving way to her being a Paramount Pictures contract star. Her glamorous style and exotic looks in Shanghai Express and Desire made her a true Hollywood star and genuinely a bankable actress. In fact, she was making more money than most of her contemporaries. Making America her home more than her birth country Germany, the legendary actress became a US citizen in 1939. When World War II broke out, Dietrich became a frontline entertainer to American soldiers. This siding with the enemies of Nazi Germany made her a controversial figure among some Germans and Nazi symphatizers. After the war, she still made some films but largely spent the 50s to the 70s performing in shows worldwide. The American Film Institute recognized her in 1999 as the ninth-greatest female star of all time. As my humble tribute to her fabulous existence and legacy in world history, theater and cinema, I created these experimental triples using old photos of her with lights and street vignettes. Second of two volumes.

  • #16601960

    shared by lakandula on 2012-07-23

    If you think Material Girl Madonna is the original master of constant self-reinvention and Fame Monster Lady Gaga is a mere copycat, you may start counting years back to pre-war Hollywood in the era of silent films to determine who is really the queen of character fabrication. These two contemporary pop icons must have found inspiration in Marlene Dietrich (27 December 1901 – 6 May 1992) - a German-American actress and singer. The constant birth and rebirth of her persona (such as being femme fatale and androgynous) both professionally and characteristically made Dietrich popular throughout her long career since being discovered as a stage performer and silent film actress in Berlin. Her stellar performance as the character Lola-Lola in Josef von Sternberg's The Blue Angel catapulted her into international stardom paving way to her being a Paramount Pictures contract star. Her glamorous style and exotic looks in Shanghai Express and Desire made her a true Hollywood star and genuinely a bankable actress. In fact, she was making more money than most of her contemporaries. Making America her home more than her birth country Germany, the legendary actress became a US citizen in 1939. When World War II broke out, Dietrich became a frontline entertainer to American soldiers. This siding with the enemies of Nazi Germany made her a controversial figure among some Germans and Nazi symphatizers. After the war, she still made some films but largely spent the 50s to the 70s performing in shows worldwide. The American Film Institute recognized her in 1999 as the ninth-greatest female star of all time. As my humble tribute to her fabulous existence and legacy in world history, theater and cinema, I created these experimental triples using old photos of her with lights and street vignettes. Second of two volumes.

  • #16602029

    shared by lakandula on 2012-07-23

    If you think Material Girl Madonna is the original master of constant self-reinvention and Fame Monster Lady Gaga is a mere copycat, you may start counting years back to pre-war Hollywood in the era of silent films to determine who is really the queen of character fabrication. These two contemporary pop icons must have found inspiration in Marlene Dietrich (27 December 1901 – 6 May 1992) - a German-American actress and singer. The constant birth and rebirth of her persona (such as being femme fatale and androgynous) both professionally and characteristically made Dietrich popular throughout her long career since being discovered as a stage performer and silent film actress in Berlin. Her stellar performance as the character Lola-Lola in Josef von Sternberg's The Blue Angel catapulted her into international stardom paving way to her being a Paramount Pictures contract star. Her glamorous style and exotic looks in Shanghai Express and Desire made her a true Hollywood star and genuinely a bankable actress. In fact, she was making more money than most of her contemporaries. Making America her home more than her birth country Germany, the legendary actress became a US citizen in 1939. When World War II broke out, Dietrich became a frontline entertainer to American soldiers. This siding with the enemies of Nazi Germany made her a controversial figure among some Germans and Nazi symphatizers. After the war, she still made some films but largely spent the 50s to the 70s performing in shows worldwide. The American Film Institute recognized her in 1999 as the ninth-greatest female star of all time. As my humble tribute to her fabulous existence and legacy in world history, theater and cinema, I created these experimental triples using old photos of her with lights and street vignettes. Second of two volumes.

  • #15966900

    shared by lakandula on 2012-05-03

    After finishing two consecutive workshops on child rights programming (one for adults who are duty bearers and another for children who are rights-holders), we went on a two-hour road travel from Roxas to Puerto Princesa. Upon checking in to our hostel, I left my colleagues to rest while I visited the cathedral and the park adjacent to it. I was in a hurry to be there while the sun was still up.

  • #15966804

    shared by lakandula on 2012-05-03

    After finishing two consecutive workshops on child rights programming (one for adults who are duty bearers and another for children who are rights-holders), we went on a two-hour road travel from Roxas to Puerto Princesa. Upon checking in to our hostel, I left my colleagues to rest while I visited the cathedral and the park adjacent to it. I was in a hurry to be there while the sun was still up.

  • #15966963

    shared by lakandula on 2012-05-03

    After finishing two consecutive workshops on child rights programming (one for adults who are duty bearers and another for children who are rights-holders), we went on a two-hour road travel from Roxas to Puerto Princesa. Upon checking in to our hostel, I left my colleagues to rest while I visited the cathedral and the park adjacent to it. I was in a hurry to be there while the sun was still up.

  • Beverly Hills Hotel

    shared by gepo1303 on 2012-09-09

    1
  • Paper shot instead of film - no filtering

    shared by adash on 2012-09-09

    Kodak Royal paper, used in minilabs, cut in strips, rolled on 120 rolls, and exposed in a Walzflex TLR. Exposure between EI 25 and 100, no filtering whatsoever. Developed in C41 colour dev for 2 min at 28 deg. cel. The result in its original RA4 developer is exactly the same, but C41 chemistry stinks less :-)

    2
  • Santa Monica Pier

    shared by gepo1303 on 2012-09-09

    2
  • Muscle Beach

    shared by gepo1303 on 2012-09-09

    2
  • #16972554

    shared by gepo1303 on 2012-09-09

    1
  • #16972561

    shared by gepo1303 on 2012-09-09

    1
  • Santa Monica Pier

    shared by gepo1303 on 2012-09-09

  • Santa Monica Pier

    shared by gepo1303 on 2012-09-09

  • #16972559

    shared by gepo1303 on 2012-09-09

    2
  • #16972553

    shared by gepo1303 on 2012-09-09

    4
  • #16972483

    shared by meryl on 2012-09-09

  • #16972485

    shared by meryl on 2012-09-09

    8
  • #16972489

    shared by meryl on 2012-09-09

    2
  • #16972493

    shared by meryl on 2012-09-09

  • #16972496

    shared by meryl on 2012-09-09

  • #16972500

    shared by meryl on 2012-09-09

    2
  • #16972503

    shared by meryl on 2012-09-09

  • Playing with Xpro

    shared by neanderthalis on 2012-09-09

    I received a roll of Kodak E100SW in a batch of low cost film. I was reading up on how to shoot Xpro. I switched the ISO to 200 and shot away. I find these better exposed than my last batch, but I still feel it may be a tad overexposed on many shots. I guess I must experiment more.

  • #16972504

    shared by meryl on 2012-09-09

    5
  • Playing with Xpro

    shared by neanderthalis on 2012-09-09

    I received a roll of Kodak E100SW in a batch of low cost film. I was reading up on how to shoot Xpro. I switched the ISO to 200 and shot away. I find these better exposed than my last batch, but I still feel it may be a tad overexposed on many shots. I guess I must experiment more.

  • Playing with Xpro

    shared by neanderthalis on 2012-09-09

    I received a roll of Kodak E100SW in a batch of low cost film. I was reading up on how to shoot Xpro. I switched the ISO to 200 and shot away. I find these better exposed than my last batch, but I still feel it may be a tad overexposed on many shots. I guess I must experiment more.

  • Playing with Xpro

    shared by neanderthalis on 2012-09-09

    I received a roll of Kodak E100SW in a batch of low cost film. I was reading up on how to shoot Xpro. I switched the ISO to 200 and shot away. I find these better exposed than my last batch, but I still feel it may be a tad overexposed on many shots. I guess I must experiment more.

  • Playing with Xpro

    shared by neanderthalis on 2012-09-09

    I received a roll of Kodak E100SW in a batch of low cost film. I was reading up on how to shoot Xpro. I switched the ISO to 200 and shot away. I find these better exposed than my last batch, but I still feel it may be a tad overexposed on many shots. I guess I must experiment more.

  • A walk with Pete and Ria

    shared by walasiteodito on 2012-09-08

    Had fun walking with Pete and Ria just around Town.

    1
  • Sunrise

    shared by walasiteodito on 2012-09-08

    I woke up early and shoot the sunrise, but then it started to shower a little so i just hurried home.

  • La Mesa Eco Park with friends

    shared by walasiteodito on 2012-09-08

    It was a holiday and we decided to have a photowalk at la mesa eco park.

    1