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Accessorize Your Lomography Petzval Lens for Maximum Flexibility when Shooting

You've got your Lomography Petzval in your hands and have shot with it, but how do you get more out of the lens and it's wonderful creamy swirling bokeh? What other goodies should you carry with you when shooting your Petzval? And what do you do when it's super bright outside and your camera's shutter or film speeds just don't allow you to expose correctly? Hopefully this video will help answer some of those questions.

Hello all. After having used my Petzval in this brutal summer sun here in Oklahoma (USA), I decided to do a video that shows some of the accessories that I think will give your photo adventures with your Petzval a little more range. And it will give you some ways to shoot in situations you would not be able to otherwise.

I am not a master speaker, so I tend to pause when I am thinking, consider that my way of buffering my stream of consciousness. I also did not get the focus as perfect as I hoped so please go with me on this when watching if things up closer aren’t in focus. I shot this 4 times and called it a day and picked the best of the bunch.

Topics in order that they are discussed.
- Intro and rambling.
- Using slower films to shoot in the bright sun.
- Turning your faster films into red scale so they are slower for bright scenes.
- Using 58mm filters, including UV, circular polarizing filters and my favorite, ND (Neutral Density) filters.
- Use of diopters and close up filters to get even closer to your subject.
- Ditching the bag and using film canisters and pill bottles, including putting your aperture blades into a pill bottle for easy access and safe keeping.
- Rubber bands, the magic fix all goodie that should be with you always. Using them to secure your aperture blades to the lens as well as general use of them with your camera.
- Close up lenses and diopters and you. Get much closer with these filters for more fun when shooting.
- Picking a camera body that fits your style. Not all bodies will meter through the Petzval, picking the right one that can meter for you helps to make it easier to enjoy using the Petzval lens.
- Pill and film canisters, again, with rubber bands, lens wipes and tape as a handy must have for your camera gear kit.
- Final rambling and gesturing.
- Slightly abrupt ending due to the camera stopping as I was finishing.

I hope you find some of my tips useful and if you have any more to add, please comment on this blog, or make your own as a compliment to mine!

(The video was shot using my Fujifilm XE-2, but to keep the analog vibe alive, I used a modified Industar-69 lens from the former Soviet Union. This lens was originally intended for use on the Chaika half-frame cameras, but is right at home on a digital camera as well, with a few adapters.)

written by alienmeatsack

3 comments

  1. alienmeatsack

    alienmeatsack

    The video is still processing over on Vimeo. Hopefully it will be done shortly!

    5 months ago · report as spam
  2. herbert-4

    herbert-4

    Wonderful blog and vlog!! I just wish LSI had made the Petzval in M42 + adapters or better, T-mount + adapters. My SLR's have M42 and Exacta mounts. No M42 leaves out most of the SLR's in the world. And Waterhouse stops are just LAME!!! A real 9 blade diaphragm is needed, and a slot ahead of the diaphragm for novelty aperatures, closed with slide. I've already suggested this stuff to LSI long ago, to them, I, probably, also want an egg in my beer...

    5 months ago · report as spam
  3. herbert-4

    herbert-4

    Just remembered... try Adox CMS II 20, ISO 12-20 with finest grain, ever, bokeh like butter!! http://www.freestyle(…).-Twin-Pack

    5 months ago · report as spam